T&T Prime Minister not perturbed by lack of invitation to US President’s residence

Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago Dr. Keith Rowley
Dr. Keith Rowley, Trinidad & Tobago Prime Minister

Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister Dr. Keith Rowley has brushed aside suggestions that Port of Spain had been snubbed by United States President Donald Trump who is expected to meet with selective CARICOM leaders on the Venezuela issue in Miami on Friday.

At a post cabinet brief on Thursday, Rowley told the media that he does not feel diminshed in anyway, having not been invited to the private residence of US President Trump.

“Ladies and gentlemen, we have never stood taller, we have never stood prouder and as I speak to you now CARICOM’s position as reaffirmed in the last meeting of heads in St. Kitts-Nevis is that there are three people representing and authorised to represent CARICOM outside of its heads and caucus and that’s the Chairman of CARICOM, who is the Prime Minister of St. Kitts-Nevis (Dr. Timothy Harris) Trinidad and Tobago its prime minister or designate and Barbados through its prime minister or designate.”

Prime Ministers Allen Chastanet (St. Lucia), Hubert Minnis ( the Bahamas), Andrew Holness (Jamaica) and Jovenel Moise (Haiti) are scheduled to meet with Trump at his private residence in Miami on Friday.

This private meeting comes after their countries, in January, supported a resolution at the Organization of American States (OAS) in not recognizing President Nicolas Maduro’s second five-year term.

But CARICOM leaders at their inter-sessional summit in St. Kitts-Nevis last month reiterated their position of non-interference in the internal affairs of Venezuela and said they were prepared to mediate in the process to bring about a peaceful resolution to the crisis where Opposition Leader Juan Guaidó with the support of Washington and its allies, is seeking to replace Maduro, who was sworn into office for a second consecutive term in January.

In late January, regional leaders, led by Harris and including Mottley and Rowley met with the United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, expressing optimism that the UN will assist in establishing the road map towards peace and security for Venezuela.

The delegation also participated in a meeting in an international meeting in Uruguay where the Montevideo Mechanism was adopted saying it presents “the only objective mechanism” to address the complex political situation in Venezuela”.

Rowley reiterated the CARICOM position on wanting a peaceful solution in Venezuela, and described the meeting taking place with Trump on Friday as a “meeting of the Lima Group” to which the Caribbean islands invited are members.

“We from early, St. Kitts-Nevis, Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, we did not sign on to the Lima Group. So we are not reacting to an invitation to a man’s house.

“Our foreign policy has always given us an insight of the road ahead. So what you seeing there is a meeting of the Lima Group people at the private residence of the president.”

“We can’t stay outside and say we should have been invited. Since when we measuring our stature and our station by who invite us to their house. We are not about that,” he said, noting that Trinidad and Tobago is about the principles as outlined in the United Nations Charter of non-interference in the internal affairs of countries and ensuring a peaceful global environment.

Dr. Keith Rowley at Thursday post-Cabinet media brief

Rowley pointed out that the leaders who will be meeting Trump on Friday are “the ones who have agreed to be a part of the Lima Group” whose sole objective he says “is regime change in Venezuela”.

Rowley said the four CARICOM leaders will decide for themselves how they will achieve the change they are looking for in Venezuela, but remained adamant that Trinidad and Tobago will “stand with the principles of the United Nations where we all have signed on and accept as the best way for peace and security, not only in our region, but the world”.

Rowley, who read a lengthy statement highlighting the Charter of the United Nations, said that he could not say whether the Guyana-based CARICOM Secretariat had been informed of the meeting with the selective regional leaders, telling reporters, however that the Secretariat “is constantly in communication with us.

“The last and the standing decision of CARICOM was that the team as put by the caucus to deal with the Venezuelan matter from a diplomatic standpoint …was the chairman, St. Kitts-Nevis, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago. That is the standing CARICOM position”.

“So any action of and member of CARICOM acting in their own sovereignty that’s what it is”.

“Think Equal, Build Smart, Innovate for Change”

The following is a message from the United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres in observance of International Women’s Day – March 8th, 2019.

Antonio Guterres, Secretary General, United Nations

Gender equality and women’s rights are fundamental to global progress on peace and security, human rights and sustainable development. We can only re-establish trust in institutions, rebuild global solidarity and reap the benefits of diverse perspectives by challenging historic injustices and promoting the rights and dignity of all.    

In recent decades, we have seen remarkable progress on women’s rights and leadership in some areas. But these gains are far from complete or consistent – and they have already sparked a troubling backlash from an entrenched patriarchy.

Gender equality is fundamentally a question of power. We live in a male-dominated world with a male-dominated culture. Only when we see women’s rights as our common objective, a route to change that benefits everyone, will we begin to shift the balance.


Only when we see women’s rights as our common objective, a route to change that benefits everyone, will we begin to shift the balance.

Increasing the number of women decision-makers is fundamental. At the United Nations, I have made this a personal and urgent priority. We now have gender parity among those who lead our teams around the world, and the highest-ever numbers of women in senior management. We will continue to build on this progress.

But women still face major obstacles in accessing and exercising power. As the World Bank found, just six economies give women and men equal legal rights in areas that affect their work. And if current trends continue, it will take 170 years to close the economic gender gap.

Nationalist, populist and austerity agendas add to gender inequality with policies that curtail women’s rights and cut social services. In some countries, while homicide rates overall are decreasing, femicide rates are rising. In others we see a rollback of legal protection against domestic violence or female genital mutilation. We know women’s participation makes peace agreements more durable, but even governments that are vocal advocates fail to back their words with action. The use of sexual violence as a tactic in conflict continues to traumatize individuals and entire societies.

Against this backdrop, we need to redouble our efforts to protect and promote women’s rights, dignity and leadership. We must not give ground that has been won over decades and we must push for wholesale, rapid and radical change.

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day, “Think Equal, Build Smart, Innovate for Change”, addresses infrastructure, systems and frameworks that have been constructed largely in line with a male-defined culture. We need to find innovative ways of reimagining and rebuilding our world so that it works for everyone. Women decision-makers in areas like urban design, transport and public services can increase women’s access, prevent harassment and violence, and improve everyone’s quality of life.

This applies equally to the digital future that is already upon us. Innovation and technology reflect the people who make them. The underrepresentation and lack of retention of women in the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and design should be a cause of concern to all.

Last month, in Ethiopia, I spent time with African Girls Can Code, an initiative that is helping to bridge the digital gender divide and train the tech leaders of tomorrow. I was delighted to see the energy and enthusiasm these girls brought to their projects. Programmes like this not only develop skills; they challenge stereotypes that limit girls’ ambitions and dreams.

On this International Women’s Day, let’s make sure women and girls can shape the policies, services and infrastructure that impact all our lives. And let’s support women and girls who are breaking down barriers to create a better world for everyone.